Convergence insufficiency and ADHD

The connection between ADHD and convergence insufficiency

There is a connection between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and convergence insufficiency. Studies have shown that many of the academic and attention related behaviors associated with ADHD are also present in individuals with convergence insufficiency. As a result some individuals who have been diagnosed with ADHD may actually have treatable convergence insufficiency.

Recent research has pointed out that children with visual impairments are more than twice as likely as the general population to have a diagnosis of ADHD.

A study published in the Journal of AAPOS : The Official Publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus/American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus in February, 2014, found that children with vision disorders are more then twice as likely as the general population to be diagnosed with ADHD. 

The authors of the study looked at a group of visually impaired children between the ages of 4 and 17. The authors found that 22.9% of the kids in this group had a parent-reported diagnosis of ADHD. That was 2.3 times greater than the national average, which is 9.5%.

The fact that a an ADHD diagnosis is twice as common in people with vision problems suggests that may people with vision problems are being misdiagnosed with ADHD. In fact ADHD diagnoses have increased “by 33% between 1997-1999 and 2006-2008.” These statistics are worrisome and suggest a possible over-diagnosis of this condition (see Feldman HM, Reiff MI. Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents. N Engl J Med. 2014;370:838-846)

Children should be tested for convergence insufficiency before accepting a diagnosis of ADHD

The best practice to avoid misdiagnosis and unnecessary medication is for a patient to have a comprehensive eye examination that tests for convergence insufficiency in cases where ADHD is suspected. It is not yet known whether convergence insufficiency causes ADHD or is only associated with ADHD.

Vision therapy can improve academic behaviors and attention

In any event, vision therapy has been shown to be the most effective treatment for convergence insufficiency indicating that individuals diagnosed with ADHD should be tested for it and if present treatment for the convergence insufficiency may resolve some or all of the observed ADHD behaviors.

In fact, research presented in October 2011 by Dr. Eric Borsting, OD, MS, FAAO, FCOVD showed exactly that, adding to the existing body of research on the connection between ADHD and convergence insufficiency.

Dr. Borsting is an optometrist who has been investigating the common behaviors associated with both ADHD and convergence insufficiency for several years.    

To the extent that the behavior of an individual thought to have ADHD is attributable to convergence insufficiency, treatment of the latter may be a benefit to the patient in resolving some or all of the patient's academic and/or behavioral issues.

The research showed that significant improvements were found in academic behaviors and attention as a result of vision therapy  for convergence insufficiency. The study involved 45 children between 9 and 17 years old with symptoms of convergence insufficiency.

All participants in the study received 16 weeks of therapy, with 8 weeks of maintenance therapy where they were not coming to the clinic every week. 

The study used two surveys to gauge behavior, the Conners 3 ADHD Index and the Academic Behavior survey.  The Conners 3 ADHD Index is a 10-item survey that screens for attention problems in children, including "inattention" and "easily distracted".  The Academic Behavior Survey is a six-item survey of behaviors that a parent can observe, such as "appears inattentive" and "avoids reading".

Dr. Borsting reported data from the two surveys and for both surveys his research team found a significant improvement in scores following vision therapy for convergence insufficiency.

 

What is schoolwork like for someone with convergence insufficiency?

This image simulates what reading is like for someone with convergence insufficiency:

This image simulates what reading is like for someone with convergence insufficiency.


Related Articles



For more information visit: www.convergenceinsufficiency.org

To read success stories about Vision Therapy and convergence
insufficiency visit: www.visiontherapystories.org/convergence_insufficiency.html 

Did you know?

Vision therapy for convergence insufficiency improves academic behaviors.

A recent study that confirms that academic behaviors, as measured by the Academic Behavior Survey (ABS), improve following successful treatment of convergence insufficiency.  The study was published in the January 2012 issue of Optometry and Vision Science

The study's conclusion was that "A successful or improved outcome after convergence insufficiency treatment was associated with a reduction in the frequency of adverse academic behaviors and parental concern associated with reading and school work as reported by parents."  

 

ADHD and convergence insufficiency research summary:





 

quotable

"of the three treatment modalities, only vision therapy/orthoptics was effective in achieving normal clinical values for both the near point of convergence and positive fusional vergence."

Scheiman et al. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Vision Therapy/ Orthoptics versus Pencil Pushups for the Treatment of Convergence Insufficiency in Young Adults. Optometrist & Vision Science 2005

 

> Is your child smart in everything except school? It could be convergence insufficiency. Click to learn more.
Convergence insufficiency infographic

 

ADHD quotes

"A successful or improved outcome after convergence insufficiency treatment was associated with a reduction in the frequency of adverse academic behaviors and parental concern associated with reading and school work as reported by parents." 

Borsting, Eric, et al. Improvement in Academic Behaviors After Successful Treatment of Convergence Insufficiency, Optometry & Vision Science, Vol. 89 No. 1 pp. 12-18, January, 2012